Category Archives: Ridley News

CHAPEL TALK: THANKS-GIVING

Written by Head of Upper School, Michele Bett

With our Thanksgiving break rapidly approaching, I wanted to take this opportunity to reflect upon why we should give thanks. In this “season of mists and mellow fruitfulness,” in the words of English poet John Keats, ripened fruits and swollen gourds signal that the wondrous bounty of mother nature’s harvest has arrived. And yes, we have much for which to give thanks.

We give thanks that at Ridley:

our teachers have high expectations of their students;

our students come to school ready to be stretched and challenged;

our teachers support and scaffold curiosity in their classrooms daily;

our students are inherently curious and motivated learners;

our teachers arrange their learning opportunities, carving out space for imagination, wonder and reflection; and

our students flourish when they find passion and relevance in their studies.

Brother David Steindl-Rast, a Benedictine monk writes on the power of gratefulness. He encourages us to see each new day as a gift where the only appropriate response is gratitude. He urges us to open our hearts to all our blessings.

It is quite radical to see each new day as a gift. If you were caught thanking the sun for rising each morning, people might wonder about your sanity. Normal people don’t go around being grateful all the time. But why not?

I believe that it behooves us to show respect for – and be grateful to – nature, other people, and the past.

We have all stood transfixed and filled with awe in the presence of nature’s marvels – Niagara Falls is an obvious and near-by example. At moments like that, it is not hard to feel a sense of gratitude and to think to ourselves, “what a wonderful world!” The feeling is probably like that of a child playing in the garden. The difference is that, unlike us, the child does not need a raging cascade to get her attention. Here is how John Keats’ older contemporary William Wordsworth put it:

There was a time when meadow, grove, and stream,
The earth, and every common sight,
To me did seem
Apparelled in celestial light,
The glory and the freshness of a dream.

The poet goes on to say that this time is gone: “The things which I have seen I now can see no more.” And yet, despite our obliviousness and routine and normalcy, nature does not stop being the miracle that it is. As a later 19th century English poet, Gerard Manley Hopkins put it: “And for all this, nature is never spent; / There lives the dearest freshness deep down things.” Even in this time of climate change and global warming, an appreciation for the blessings of life on this earth is still the right way to respond. In fact, I wonder if things might be different on our planet if more people felt more grateful to nature.

At Ridley, we frequently emphasize the importance of thanking each other as often as we can. By doing so, we are recognizing the worth and significance of other people. It turns out that admitting the reality of what is outside ourselves is a necessary step toward well-being. Furthermore, by thanking others, we are acknowledging the other’s presence as a gift. We are saying to the other: “You have given me something that I did not deserve; you have been to me more than a friend.” What almost inevitably comes next is: “I will do the same for you when I can. I will try to be a gift to you.” It is a virtuous circle that fosters and celebrates loving relationships.

Being thankful for the past might seem somewhat strange, even suspicious; some of us might feel much more inclined to reject the past in our struggle for a better world. But human civilizations and cultures throughout all time have universally honoured those who have lived and died in earlier times. Similarly, our society commemorates heroes and martyrs and wise people who have done or said things that remain meaningful to us today. One of those we remember is Martin Frobisher, who in 1578 arrived in Canada and held a formal ceremony in which he gave thanks for surviving the long voyage from England. (Some 43 years later, the Pilgrims arrived in Massachusetts and did something similar.) This nation began by opening its heart in gratitude to the blessings of life.

And that’s why I am so grateful to be part of a community that has opened its heart to all its blessings. Every student in our community is a blessing, and regardless of their academic trajectory, they are cared for and valued. They are loved.

As in so many of my chapel talks and conversations with parents and students it is the character strength of love that I find myself returning to so often. Love, it seems, underpins nearly everything we do at Ridley.

In the gospels, God tells who we are, and we know that it can be the hardest thing in the world for us to receive love, especially the love of God. Whether you are a Christian, Moslem, Jew, Buddhist, non-believer, let’s be united in the idea that love is the strongest thing in the world, and to receive it demands that we begin by loving ourselves.

Unlike the bees in Keats’ ode to “Autumn,” we know that these warm October days will cease, but giving thanks at Ridley is not limited to the season of thanksgiving. At Ridley, we practice gratitude daily, all year round. May I wish all our families at Ridley a Thanksgiving break filled with joy, appreciation and, of course, much love.

Fresh Year, Fresh Start: How Ridley helps students forge their own paths

Written by Head of Upper School, Michele Bett

A new school year is just around the corner, and it is holding out hands full of promise. It is time for another fresh start, time to discover the wealth of untapped potential among our magnificent community of learners. Who can say what great new friendships will be forged in the Houses of Ridley College, what tests of courage, commitment, and collaboration will be faced on our sports fields, or what giant steps will be taken on the path of success?

Ah, but what do I mean by “success”? What do we at Ridley think we are trying to achieve? I would like to explore – and perhaps clarify – what success looks like from a Ridley College perspective, and to suggest a way for you parents to help.

Sir Ken Robinson’s highly regarded book, Finding Your Element: How to discover your talents and passions and transform your life, might be a good place to begin our exploration. Robinson says that one’s “element” is the convergence of natural talents and personal passions, and that finding one’s element is the most important quest that any of us can have. Finding your element is the quest to find yourself.

This quest involves both an outward and inward journey. The outward journey is the discovery of the opportunities the world can offer. The inward journey includes unlocking a student’s academic aptitude and accepting one’s unique purpose. 

Speaking of purpose, I have been impressed by Richard Leider’s recently published The Power of Purpose: Find Meaning, Live Longer, Better. In this book, the author says that to live with purpose is to actively live one’s values. Purpose is our essence and what makes each of us so special. When we get up in the morning ready to contribute to the world, we are living with purpose, living with meaning. Living like this is not just living – it is living well.

Research suggests that having a purpose requires an aim outside ourselves. Naming our purpose helps satisfy our need to matter and feel worthy. Through a Ridley College lens, we can see three important messages for our students:

  • They are part of something bigger than themselves;
  • They are committing to live a life of service; 
  • They are going to transform a world that needs them.

So when we talk about steps on the path of success, we are saying that the quest for each of us at Ridley is to find our element, our passion, and our purpose. Once we identify these, we need to learn how to live these values every day.

We believe that advisors, housemasters, teachers and coaches can all provide invaluable assistance to students on this quest because authentic learning and discovery thrive in a kind and caring community.

I think that high school is the right time for young people to begin thinking about these things. Students confront a bewildering range of choices and must make decisions all the time, but the most important of these decisions have to do with their own identity and integrity. 

I am reminded of a poem that many of you will be familiar with by American poet Robert Frost, called “The Road Not Taken.” In it, the speaker is walking through the woods, comes upon a fork in the path ahead and wonders which way to go. It is not always easy to know which road leads to success, to one’s purpose. As Apple co-founder Steve Jobs once said, you cannot connect the dots going forward; you can only connect the dots looking back. In other words, despite our best-laid plans, we can never know the future. It is only when we look back on those choices, those experiences, those seemingly chance encounters, that we can discern a direction.

So it is in the poem. The speaker finally chooses one of the roads, recognizing he will never know what he has missed by not choosing the other, but concluding that his choice has “made all the difference” in his life. The Grateful Dead sang a similar sentiment: 

There is a road, no simple highway

Between the dawn and the dark of night,

And if you go, no one may follow,

That path is for your steps alone.

As their popular song suggests, this path, this quest for one’s element, passion and purpose is exclusive, singular, “for your steps alone.” This year, each of us at Ridley will make choices that help to define us as unique individuals and to name that purpose that drives us forward. There is always some risk in making a choice, since we cannot know exactly where it will lead us, but when we look back one day we will be able to connect those dots, to see how our life’s path has led us to become who we are.

Given the various quests of the members of our community and the many pathways that lie ahead of us, perhaps you will understand when I write how delighted I am by the wonderful adventure that awaits us this year. But I also mentioned that there is a way that you could help. Of course, as parents you know your children in ways we never can, but there is one area on which to focus that I think could be valuable. 

Lea Waters, the developer of the Visible Well-Being program (which as some of you know has been adopted by Ridley College), has recently published a study that investigates the relationship between what she calls “strength-based parenting” and educational outcomes. 

A strength-based approach to parenting is one in which parents encourage their children to recognize and use their own character strengths. These strengths may include humour, kindness, self-control, persistence and so on. Waters accepts that emotional warmth and appropriate control are important aspects of parenting, but suggests that awareness and acknowledgement by parents of their child’s strengths helps support the healthy development of the child’s character and personality. 

Furthermore, Waters’ work shows how promoting a young person’s character strengths fosters academic achievement. She found that strength-based parenting not only influences a child’s well-being but also positively affects academic outcomes. Surely, it is good to know that Ridley’s emphasis on our students’ visible well-being has benefits both in and outside the classroom. Universities in Canada and beyond are still interested in student grades, and I believe that our educational priorities, along with your support, provide the best possible environment for young people to flourish academically, socially and personally.

In closing, I want to offer a warm welcome as we embark on our exciting, collective journey of discovery this year. Ridley’s faculty and administration are dedicated to helping each of our students discover their element, passion and purpose, and to thrive in every area of school life. This year will provide many challenges for us all – but challenges are simply stepping-stones to growth when we love what we do. 

Author and speaker Simon Sinek famously said, “Working hard for something we don’t care about is called stress. Working hard for something we love is called passion.” One of our most important tasks as educators – and parents – is to help your children, our students, find their passion by discovering what they truly love.

Get to Know Your Prefects: Steven Q. ’20

Introducing Steven ’20 – a proud Tiger who has truly taken advantage of all that Ridley has to offer. Read about the challenges he overcame and the success he has experienced in the interview with Steven below.

Why were you most excited to attend Ridley when you first started?

When I first visited the campus, I was deeply attracted by the energy of the students and the community. Everyone was super friendly and there is always something to do and something happening. I simply couldn’t wait to throw myself into the action and get started. 

What makes you proud to be a Ridleian?

Definitively the unbreakable bond between Ridleians. There is no better feeling than to bump into an OR on the street or at a university that I visited and still be able to chat like old times while grabbing a coffee. The connection you build during your time at Ridley will be priceless later on in your life. It really gives you a sense of belonging and unity. Also, can’t forget Snake Dance! 

What is your favourite part of Ridley life?

My favorite part of Ridley life is strolling through the campus at daybreak, watching the sunrise as the fog slowly clears from the fields. Getting takeout with friends and eating them on the field as the sun slowly sets is definitely a bonus as well! Not to mention the sweet, sweet feeling when you see a level 7 on your test or scoring the killing blow on the tennis court. 

What has been your favorite Ridley experience/trip/memory?

Well… It’s hard to say because I have so many! I appreciate every day I spend at this school, and everyday holds something different and unique for me to discover. I have made so many irreplaceable memories with my friends, my teammates and my teachers it would take forever to count them. Therefore, I am afraid I can’t give you a good answer, not before my graduation. 

What is the best part of being in your boarding House?

The best part of belonging to a boarding house is the feeling of home.  I have been both a day and boarding student in Merritt North House, and the boys I have met and became friends with throughout the past three years are all very easygoing and friendly. The Head of House and Residential Dons are always there for you. The overall environment of my House will make you feel right at home. No matter if you returned tired from a heavy day of school or sports, you can always count on your housemates to relax together and play some pool in the common room. 

What has been your greatest accomplishment at Ridley?

It depends on how you define accomplishments. For me, I don’t like to define my accomplishments at this school by the prizes I won. They are merely a token of recognition. My real, greatest accomplishments at this school would be that I have really grown as an individual. In Grade 7, I was this shy student that wasn’t very good at English and was afraid of this foreign and vast country. Now I am a proud Ridley student, enrolling in full IB diploma, member of the 2019-20 Prefect team, president of the Ridley College Model United Nations society, and a senior member of the Choir. I have made the best memories of my high school life at this school, and I have learned indispensable transferrable skills that I will most definitely need even after I graduate from Ridley College. 

The Drowsy Chaperone, by Michelle Scrivener

Who is your favorite faculty or staff member and why?

Wow… You are putting me in a tight spot here. All the faculty and staff members around have all supported me in their own unique way. And I always appreciate their help and their dedication to educate every student here at Ridley, so that they may be better prepared for the world beyond the gates. 

What part of being a Prefect are you most excited for?

I am most excited to continue the legacy left by the previous Prefects while working with my current, fellow Prefects to innovate and create new student-led initiatives in order to make Ridley College a place enjoyed by both students and faculty members alike. 

How has Ridley prepared you for the future?

Ridley College has taught me so much. I learned teamwork and perseverance on the sports field, I honed my public speaking and debating skills on stage as an actor and debater. I polished my singing in Chapel along with rest of the Choir. I learned what it means to learn and flourish through my teachers, and how to love myself and others around me through my friends. 

What advice would you give prospective students about Ridley?

DON’T PROCRASINATE!!!!!! Seriously, please, please, please, please, don’t procrastinate, especially if you are a boarder. It is so easy to get lost in all the stuff Ridley has to offer and you will wind up crunching away at a major project, two hours before its due… (ahem that guy definitively wasn’t me…) Ridley College is a school that places heavy emphasis on academic excellence, especially if you are planning on taking the full IB Diploma. And it only gets worse busier once you start Grade 10 and beyond. Make sure you make yourself a schedule and STICK TO IT. Ask teachers and your Head of House for help– they will more than happy to help you out because they care about your well-being. Only when you have an organized life can you enjoy all the wonderful things Ridley has to offer. 

Promoting Antifragility in Education

Written by Head of Upper School, Michele Bett

In 2008, the New York writer Lenore Skenazy found herself at the centre of a media storm, but she probably only had herself to blame. She had published an article in the New York Sunnewspaper and then had been interviewed on national television, all in the effort to explain her seemingly novel approach to parenting. The results were not quite what she anticipated, for before long she was widely decried as “America’s Worst Mom.”

What was Skenazy’s offense? She had let her 9-year old son ride the New York subway by himself. Her son had wanted to do this for some time, so she took him to a downtown Metro station and then gave him a ticket, a map, some money, and clear instructions how to get home. Forty-five minutes later, right on time, he reached his house, delighted with his experience. His happy mother wrote about it in the newspaper. But after hearing the story, the country was shocked.

Mr Kidd, our Headmaster, and several Ridley administrators learned more of Leonore Skenazy’s fall from grace at the International Positive Psychology Conference in Melbourne, Australia last month, where one of  the keynote speakers was Jonathan Haidt, author of several books including his most recent The Coddling of the American Mind: How Good Intentions and Bad Ideas are Setting Up a Generation for Failure.Along with other educators, researchers, psychologists, counselors and academics from across the world, we learned  more about the new word at the conference: “antifragility.”

The concept of antifragility is not really new; in fact, it is very common in the field of health care and in our understanding of the human immune system. The idea is that some things, like china teacups, are naturally fragile; others, like plastic teacups, are naturally resilient; but still others, and especially complex systems like human beings, are antifragile: they requirestressors and challenges to learn, adapt, and grow.

According to Haidt, understanding about antifragility is important to educators and parents. Children need to develop their own interests, learn how to make decisions and solve problems, cultivate their ability to regulate their emotions, and discover how to get along with others and experience joy. Over-scheduled children surrounded by risk-averse adults are less likely to acquire these important life skills.

As it happens, trying to eliminate all risks from children’s lives might even be dangerous. There may be a psychological analog to the hygiene hypothesis proposed to explain the dramatic recent increase in allergies. In other words, by codling our children and over-protecting them we may be denying them the real opportunity to learn from their mistakes. 

At the Positive Psychology Conference in Melbourne, Haidt explained  that positive child development thrives under conditions of unsupervised free play, autonomy, risk, and even failure. Short-term stress is not to be avoided – it is essential for proper growth. Negative experiences provide rapid learning and strengthening. Those young people who are prepared for the failures they will encounter in life will have gained the resilience and mental fortitude to succeed. This is summed up in the saying: “Prepare the child for the road, not the road for the child.”

Haidt claimed that the generation born at the beginning of the 21stcentury might well be the loneliest ever because so many children spend so much time indoors. They may be digitally connected, but this electronic connectivity does not nurture authentic and enduring relationships. When children go outside, climb trees, play with friends, swim lakes and enjoy nature, they are augmenting their well-being. Haidt’s advice to parents is to get your children out of their bedrooms or they may  just end up living in your basements!

Of course, giving children opportunities to participate in activities like hockey camp, basketball practice and piano lessons is important; but Haidt wants us also to give children the freedom to develop their curiosity, exercise their creativity and just marvel at the wonderful world around them. He wants us to give our children the precious gift of un-sanitised, un-structured time that will nurture their imagination and wonder.

Lenore Skenazy responded to her own negative experiences with America’s media by starting a blog called Free-Range Kidsand a non-profit called Let Grow, where she calls out over-protectionism and offers advice for parents wanting to raise healthy, happy children. A lot of parents today, Skenazy says, “ see no difference between letting their kids walk to school and letting them walk through a firing range”. Any risk is seen as too much risk. But, as she points out, we parents have to realise that the greatest risk of all just might be trying to raise a child who never encounters choice or independence. 

Our long summer break  is not quite over, and there’s still opportunity for us to cultivate our very own free range Ridleians. Although high attainment is certainly one of the elements that account for success at Ridley College, there’s more. At Ridley, we celebrate and emphasise positive emotions, engagement, relationships, and meaning in addition to grades and exam results. Under the leadership of Mr Kidd, Ridley’s central mission has been to help young people to discover what it takes to lead a flourishing life, not just in this community but also beyond our gates. Our aim is to prepare all our children for the road.

Get to Know Your Prefects: Sydney M. ’20

Introducing Sydney M. ’20 – a boarding student from Trinidad and Tobago, who has made a home for herself amongst a flock of flamingos. Read about her experience in the boarding house and what has made it her favourite part of Ridley life.

Why were you most excited to attend Ridley when you first started?

I was most excited to attend Ridley so that I could meet new people, make friends from all around the world and have the ability to learn about different cultures and lifestyles .

What makes you proud to be a Ridleian?

The sense of community at Ridley makes me so proud to be a Ridleian. Every single person that attends Ridley – whether it is the students, faculty or staff – is involved, encouraged and welcomed in some way and it is truly beautiful to see and to be a part of. 

What is your favourite part of Ridley life?

My favourite  part of Ridley life is the residential life.

What is the best part of being in your boarding house?

The best part of my boarding house are the girls that make up Gooderham West. I  have made so many friendships and had so many experiences that I will cherish for the rest of my life and I owe it all to them. They are such a welcoming, easygoing, accepting and friendly group of people, and they are like my second family…we even share rooms! I am beyond grateful.

What has been your greatest accomplishment at Ridley?

My  greatest accomplishment at Ridley has been becoming a Prefect.

Who is your favourite faculty or staff member and why?

My favourite faculty member is my Advisor, Ms. Scott. I can go to her with any problem or situation I have and she will always give me great advice on how to go about the problem effectively and responsibly . She is very kind, giving, selfless and easy to talk to. She is like a mother away from home for me, not to mention she is a math teacher and helps me whenever I am struggling.

What part of being a Prefect are you most excited for?

I am most excited to work with the other members of the Prefect team, as it is a very diverse group of people and I think we can brainstorm and create some really fun and exciting activities for the student body to participate in. 

How has Ridley prepared you for the future?

Ridley has encouraged me to become an independent individual, taught me how to manage my time effectively and how to be aware of what is expected of me. I believe these new skills will help me in the future whether it’s in the workplace or beyond.

What advice would you give prospective students about Ridley?

As I was a new student not too long ago, I believe you should look at all of your options and imagine yourself attending the school. I visited three schools including Ridley and from the minute I walked onto the beautiful campus of the school , I knew this was where I wanted to go. Meeting students, witnessing the classes and experiencing the sense of family and community at Ridley only cemented my ideas.

Get to Know Your Prefects: Catherine F. ’20

Meet Catherine ’20 – a talented student-athlete, who can often be found skating up and down the ice in the Tiger Arena or supporting her fellow Crocodiles in Gooderham East. Read more to discover the milestones and accomplishments that have influenced Catherine’s Ridley career.


Why were you most excited to attend Ridley when you first started?

I was most excited to start my journey at Ridley and meet new friends coming from all-over the world. I was also very thrilled of being part of its very well-known hockey programme and school curriculum. Ridley College is modern and well-organized in all aspects. The second I stepped under the arches of Ridley, I knew this is where I wanted to be. 

What makes you proud to be a Ridleian?

I am extremely proud of being a Ridleian for numerous reasons. Firstly, there is no better sense of community than at Ridley College – people care for each individual’s growth and flourishment.  Secondly, this school embraces modern philosophies, and new technologies for greater learning and experiences.  Lastly, I’ve realized that this school has an extremely great reputation.  When someone is wearing a Ridley sweater, she/he will cross paths with another that knows a Ridleian or has gone to Ridley themselves.  Day-to-day, I go to school knowing that someone cares about each other’s development and success.  I am extremely proud to be a Ridleian.

What is your favourite part of Ridley life?

I have enjoyed my hockey experience in many ways – the team experience, friendships, development and success. I made lifetime friends and memories. From bus rides to plane rides, we ended up creating a strong connection with trust and loyalty. I also loved social life at Ridley – we’ve had a lot of laughs and amazing interactions during events and activities such as school dances, café, Bradley shield competitions, etc. 

What has been your favorite Ridley experience?

My favorite Ridley memory was when my team and I went to play hockey in Vancouver. It was our first trip on the plane together. We were all so excited to go on a trip across Canada with each other. We had a lot of fun while visiting a suspension bridge – this activity helped us bond as a team. We were at first a little scared to walk on a moving bridge up in the air, but then we crossed it laughing. It was a key moment for the growth of our team and friendships.

What is the best part of being in your boarding House?

Gooderham East is a very positive environment. I would say that people make G-East one of the best Houses of campus.  My Head of House and Assistant Head of House are both very positive and outgoing people. They deeply care for every single girl in the House.  They guide us towards growth, for us to achieve a better self. They are always there to help us. Also, our house maintenance ladies are tremendously caring – they assure that Ridley is welcoming and homey. All in all, G-East is a House full of trust – this is my home away from home.

What has been your greatest accomplishment at Ridley?

I am extremely proud of having won the CISAA league championship with my hockey team.  We worked so hard throughout the year to develop our skills and team chemistry to achieve this goal. On a personal note, I have to mention my commitment to play hockey at Boston University after graduation. My coaches and teachers helped me achieve that goal by pushing me every single day to become a better student-athlete.

Who is your favourite faculty or staff member and why?

There is lots of special faculty and staff members; Mrs. Postma, my Head of House, being one of them. She is an exceptional person, being very positive and caring. She is always there to make me feel at home, and support me throughout the year. Her continuous smile helped me stay positive the whole year.

What part of being a Prefect are you most excited for?

Being a Prefect at Ridley College means a lot to me, particularly to be part of this special group of students. We, as a group, are very diverse. I have no doubt that we will all bring different ideas and perspective to the table. I am looking forward to doing different activities and initiatives with this group to help and improve the Ridley College community. I want to positively participate in others’ memorable time at Ridley College.

How has Ridley prepared you for the future?

Ridley helps me to be more open-minded to new ideas and new ways of learning.  The exceptional teaching staff give me tools and responsibilities to help me be more prepared for future challenges. The IB programme is very well-structure and challenging to further develop skills and knowledge for post-graduation experiences. On the other hand, my hockey coaches help me every day to improve and have an impact at the next level, not only as a hockey player, but also as a person. I’ve learned how to trust my abilities and knowledge.

What advice would you give prospective students about Ridley?

My best advice for all prospective students would be to take advantage of all the resources offered at Ridley. If you always wanted to be part of a certain club, sign up for it, if you want to be part of an activity and it does not exist, create one. There are so many opportunities, so take advantage of them. Here, at Ridley College, we can go out of our personal comfort zone in many different ways. Always be in the moment and trust yourself. You can do more than you could ever think of. Make your experience at Ridley the best imaginable.

Get to Know your Prefects: Simon H. ’20

Introducing Simon ’20 – a student who found countless opportunities to flourish, learn and succeed once he walked through the Marriott Gates. Check out our interview with Simon below, to see how Ridley’s community has made him proud and encouraged him to grow.

Why were you most excited to attend Ridley when you first started?

It’s certain that here at Ridley, there are infinite opportunities and possibilities in the activities, sports, and courses I could choose. In the first term, I was so excited about joining the Second soccer team and robotics team in which I experienced different challenges and surprises every day. Choosing computer technology and art courses, which I hadn’t had a chance to learn, additionally enriched my Ridley life. The caring and inspiring peers and faculties motivated me to overcome challenges, pursue dreams, and be enthusiastic for every day. 

What makes you proud to be a Ridleian?

There is no doubt that the global vision and engagement at Ridley makes me proud to be a Ridleian. The culturally diverse community at Ridley has allowed me to learn and reflect on cultures and issues happening in every part of the world. My friends come from Germany, Nigeria, Ukraine, Korea, Mexico, and more, and we all have unique stories and experiences to share. The experiences provide me valuable visions on the global scale and encourage me to care about and contribute to global issues.

What is your favorite part of Ridley life?

My favorite part of Ridley life is the athletic programme. I have always wanted to have more opportunities to play soccer and tennis before coming to Ridley, and Ridley does give the opportunity. These sports really relax me, giving time away from a busy academic life and keep me energetic. Moreover, I enjoy collaborating with friends and competing with other schools.

What has been your favorite Ridley experience?

My favorite Ridley memory has been the VEX Robotics World Championship which took place in Kentucky. In the competition, I chatted and made friends with like-minded peers from diverse countries. They were all very kind and are as enthusiastic about robotics as I am. We found a lot of common topics including robotics, new technologies, and cultural differences. Moreover, during the games, we were able to communicate and collaborate with teams from the US, Mexico, Norway, and more, and engaged in global collaboration. I also realized how intense global competition is. There are top teams from different countries represented, which make the game difficult. The experience in the VEX robotics tournament is intense, inspiring, and memorable; I not only learned from competitions but also enjoyed it a lot with Mr. Reimer, Mr. McCambley and my teammates. 

What is the best part of being in your boarding House?

The best part of my boarding House are the people in the house. Everyone in Arthur Bishop West is really nice and supportive. Mr. Doyle, Mr. Vasquez, and Mr. Sullivan give me a sense of security to live in my boarding house. I have many friends in my house, and we play and study together and help each other out.

What has been your greatest accomplishment at Ridley?

My greatest accomplishment at Ridley is winning the highest proficiency award in Grade 11. The IB courses are all very interesting but challenging. I learned a wide variety of knowledge and acquired new skills which prepared me for future learning and occupations. To me, the award confirms that passion and hard-work will always create good results. With the encouragement of the award, I wish to continue sailing in the sea of knowledge and curiosity, exploring new lands out of the horizon. 

Undergraduate Prize Giving 2019

Who is your favourite faculty or staff member and why?

It’s really hard for me to decide the criteria of favourite faculty, and my teachers are all very supportive and inspiring to me. Thinking about my teachers, as I was looking at this question, the more experiences I recalled, the more confused I am, because I love all my teachers though each of them has different shinning points that touch my heart. The first faculty I thought about is Mr. Reimer, my computer science teacher and robotics coach. Not only did he give me a lot of profound and ingenious ideas in academics and life, but also did he share a lot of funny stories and experiences with me.

What part of being a Prefect are you most excited for?

I am really excited to contribute to Ridley community and make it better following the great example set by last year’s Prefects. On the way, I would face challenges and difficulties, but I’m excited to overcome them.

How has Ridley prepared you for the future?

Ridley leads me to develop myself and remain balanced. I have participated in sports, services, and activities which improves my leadership, global vision, and social responsibility and the IB curriculum has given me high self-reflection ability and passion for applying knowledge learned. I’m confident that I’m better prepared for study at university and a career in the engineering and entrepreneur field.

What advice would you give prospective students about Ridley?

Never could one imagine how energetic and supportive the Ridley community is before being a part of it. My teachers, coaches, and friends all help me a lot when I explore new ideas and plans. So, bravely pursue your dream no matter if it’s academic, athletic, artistic or service inspired and don’t be afraid to ask for help. The whole community will support and be behind you. However, when we go for our dream, we cannot lose sight of the busyness of Ridley life. We need to manage our time wisely so that we could finish all the work in good quality and seize opportunities.

Get to Know Your Prefects: Debbie D. ’20

Meet Debbie ’20 – a student who had a life changing experience during her Grade 9 year, that inspired her and her friends to start a service-learning trip of their own! Read more to see how leadership and service have guided her Ridley career and how she plans to lead in the coming school year.

Why were you most excited to attend Ridley when you first started?

When I first saw Ridley, I was attracted by all the smiley faces when I walked around campus. After my tour of the school, I was attracted again by all the buildings at Ridley, and also the feeling of multiculturalism. I was thinking if I can study in such a pretty building and with people from so many different countries I would be really grateful for that.

What makes you proud to be a Ridleian?

Ridley has inspired me, taught me to flourish and really changed my perspectives in variety different ways. I have learned a lot and become much more mature in my time at Ridley. I am very proud to be a Ridleian.

What is your favourite part of Ridley life? 

My favorite part of Ridley is residence life. Ridley is my second home and living on campus makes me feel peaceful and happy. Being part of my residence makes me felt very included, and I like to share my life with the rest of my housemates.

What has been your favorite Ridley experience?

My favorite Ridley experience was during my Grade 9 March break. In 2017, my friends and I attended a service trip and travelled to Guatemala together. 

What is the best part of being in your boarding House?

Mandeville is a united House, and every member in this house is very kind and helpful. All students in Mandeville House knows how to respect each other and love each other. All the faculty and staff in Mandeville offer help and advice, and care about the students in this house. Also, the students from Mandeville felt happy and enjoyed staying in this House, and all of us felt included and loved. 

What has been your greatest accomplishment at Ridley?

I think my greatest accomplishment at Ridley would be organizing a brand-new service trip to China with a few of my friends at Ridley. In my opinion, this service trip did not only help the local students in China; it also allowed Ridley students to experience a different culture, so I think my friends and I have provided and created a really good opportunity for the Ridley student body. 

Who is your favorite faculty or staff member and why?

I like all faculty in Ridley College, and one of my favorite faculty members at Ridley is Mrs. Thompson, because she has been my Head of House since Grade 9, and in all these years, she has cared for me and helped me a lot when I needed it. She’s very kind and funny, and she made me feel really included and welcomed since the first day I joined the Ridley community, so I’m really grateful for her

What part of being a Prefect are you most excited for?

In the upcoming year, I am very excited to help out as many students as I can, and try to come up with more creative ideas to make a better and more enjoyable life for the student body. 

How has Ridley prepared you for the future?

Both the academic and co-curricular programmes at Ridley have prepared me for my future. All the awesome teachers who taught me before, and all the faculty who helped me before, they all are my preparation for the future. I have learned a lot from them. All the activities I have participated in is another great way to prepare me for future because each different activity teaches me a new perspective.  Ridley has inspired me. 

What advice would you give prospective students about Ridley?

The advice I would give prospective students about Ridley based on my three years experiences would be: enjoy every second and moment at Ridley, learn from Ridley and be inspired. 

Get to Know Your Prefects: Jason L. ’20

Meet Jason ’20 – a student who stepped out of his comfort zone and has embraced every opportunity during his time at Ridley. Read Jason’s powerful thoughts on the community at Ridley and the environment that has allowed him to flourish.

Why were you most excited to attend Ridley when you first started?

I didn’t have the idea of studying aboard until the year before. I realized that I will have more opportunities and really be able to do what I like. I was most excited to meet new people and maybe become friends for life. That process took me a while because I spoke poor English when I came to Canada. There were uncertainties, which actually motivated me to explore the possibilities at Ridley. I didn’t expect the great amount of activities and sports here, and I started my Ridley journey trying each one of them.

What makes you proud to be a Ridleian?

The community in which I live makes me proud as a Ridleian. As a new comer three years ago, I was deeply touched by how welcoming the Ridley community is. Those fantastic spirits definitely passed down and still exist. The legacy that generations of Ridleians carry is growing stronger and firmer every year. The community is encouraging, supportive, caring and enthusiastic. Even in the toughest times, members of Ridley come together and stay strong. We face obstacles, solve problems and reflect as a whole instead of an individual. The amount of support I have received in the past three years is sensational, which is leads to an extraordinary experience for me.  

What is your favourite part of Ridley life?

My favorite part of Ridley is the arts. I love the arts and have had a passion for it starting a long time ago. The fact that Ridley is able to teach and let students explore a variety of arts is incredible for me because I didn’t have those in China. I will be either working in a visual art studio or acting on stage. There are two theater productions each year, one is a play and the other is a musical. Both of them are fantastic and give me different experiences as an actor. Of course, the co-curricular programme also has clubs and activity for the arts. I am involved in the arts council and choir for example, it’s always exciting to hear new initiatives in the arts, especially those driven by students.

What has been your favorite Ridley experience?

My favorite Ridley experience so far has been the winter theater production of 2018-2019, The Drowsy Chaperone. No one can argue that the excitement of being involved in a musical is amazing. From auditions to the final show, students actors, designers, managers and faculty directors put great efforts into this production. For me, to learn and present a tap dance number with my co-actor on stage. There is always learning no matter what you do. I believe that it is the process of learning, engaging and committing in such a large production gives me lessons of inspiration and life. Thanks to everyone who worked so hard to make this experience possible.

The Drowsy Chaperone, by Michelle Scrivener

What is the best part of being in your boarding House?

The best part of being in Merritt North is to share. Houses are like smaller communities, divisions of the entire Ridley community. Merritt North is my home away from home and the people are my second family. There’s no doubt that every year we get extremely emotional for graduation, but excited for the next year. There is a huge possibility that your best friend in Ridley is someone in the House. One of the highlights of 2018-2019 was watching the Toronto Raptors winning the NBA Championship in the common room together. Although there were only few people left in the house, our enthusiasm didn’t fade at all.

What has been your greatest accomplishment at Ridley?

My greatest accomplishment at Ridley has been being offered a role as Prefect. This has been my goal since Grade 9. A Prefect from the Class of 2017 inspired me as a person and student, so this has been a long time promise too I suppose. Thanks, Hunter. Besides becoming a Prefect, the best feeling ever has been to be recognized and encouraged by the community. I am extremely thankful to everything that Ridley has given to me and it’s time to serve back. Terar Dum Prosim is not only a school motto, but also a motivation and an inspiration.

Who is your favourite faculty or staff member and why?

Mr. Jones is my favourite teacher at Ridley. Mr. Jones was my advisor in Grade 9, and he has been here for all Merritt North boys for five years now, which is incredible. Mr. Jones is a great science teacher with knowledge, a passionate hockey coach with enthusiasm, an Assistant Head of House with great skills and a mentor with wisdom. Mr. Jones has helped me through the toughest year of my life, and he is always there to assist the boys when they need it. He is also going to be the Merritt North Head of House next year and I look forward to work with him for my final year.

What part of being a Prefect are you most excited for?

I am most exited for all new encounters. Whether it is people or things, I do want to make this a year that I will remember forever. I want to have conversations and possibly find some new friends. I am also excited to develop my initiative as Prefect, as well as hold a torch at Snake Dance.

How has Ridley prepared you for the future?

Ridley has prepared me well in academics, sports and characteristic development, especially in leadership. Throughout my three years, I have developed new skills and gotten better in general. Without the help and support from the community, that would not have been possible.

What advice would you give prospective students about Ridley?

Be brave, be open, be positive, be thankful and be yourself. And most importantly, be true to yourself and false to no man. I believe every student has potential to be great and I wish your journey in Ridley will be good as mine.

Get to Know Your Prefects: Max C. ’20

Meet Max ’20 – a boarder from California, who has found home at Ridley, as a member of Dean’s House. Although he can often be found in the Tiger Arena, this athlete has a knack for science as well! Read some of the highlights of his first year at Ridley below.

Why were you most excited to attend Ridley when you first started?

Coming to Ridley, the thing I was most excited for was to play ice hockey and be a part of the Ridley boarding school culture.

What makes you proud to be a Ridleian?

I am proud to be a Ridleian because of the variety of things that Ridley strives and excels in. At Ridley, our culture cannot be defined as solely a sports school or academic school because we have a student body that can be and is successful in so many different aspects.

What is your favourite part of Ridley life?

My favourite part of Ridley is the boarding life offered. Boarding life truly adds to the Ridley culture and atmosphere of connecting us and bringing our community together. The culture within our boarding Houses has allowed me to form some of the strongest bonds and friendships that I have in my life.

What has been your favorite Ridley experience?

Road trips with my hockey team have been some of my greatest Ridley experiences in the last year. Road trips were a huge part of the journey last year with my team. In the moments from hotel room fun to warming up at the ice rink, I have had the time of my life with my best friends and teammates.

What is the best part of being in your boarding House?

Having my friends nearby all the time. This makes living in the house always a super fun experience with many friends to share the good times with.

What has been your greatest accomplishment at Ridley?

Winning the award for the best medical sciences project in the Niagara Regional Science and Engineering Fair. This reward was the accumulation of countless hours, help from my teachers, and dedication into a project that I was truly passionate about. That is why winning this award and receiving the recognition for my project has been one of the most meaningful and greatest accomplishments of my life.

Who is your favourite faculty or staff member and why?

My favorite faculty member is Mrs. Roud. As both a teacher and Head of House, she is so caring and helpful. Without her constant love and support there is no way that I could have had such an amazing first year at Ridley.

What part of being a Prefect are you most excited for?

I am very excited for many things in the role of a Prefect. What I am most excited for however is to be a role model in the Ridley community and have the chance to inspire other students. Coming to Ridley, I looked up to the Prefects and they were a great inspiration to me. Now, I am excited be a role model for other students and inspire them just as I was as a new student.

How has Ridley prepared you for the future?

Ridley has taught me how to challenge myself and has shown me that when I push myself, I can accomplish so much more than I previously thought. The opportunities that Ridley has given has influenced me to step out of my comfort zone and learn so much more about who I am and want to be in the future.

What advice would you give prospective students about Ridley?

The one piece of advice that I would give to Ridley students is to take advantage of the amazing opportunities that Ridley has to offer. Ridley has so many opportunities for students of all interests. For me, this meant pursuing the IB Diploma and also playing Prep Hockey. And, even if you have never tried some of these things or are nervous of stepping out of your comfort zone, Ridley is an amazing opportunity to try new things with a student body and faculty that will be nothing but supportive.