Tag Archives: Rowing

Going the Distance: Jim Butterfield ’70

Raised on rowing by Ridley’s best, Jim Butterfield ’70 knows how sport can inspire, support and bring people together. Now, the Bermudian businessman shares how he keeps moving forward—and is giving back to his community.  

Jim Butterfield was on the soccer field when Coach Mark Gallop came up and asked if he knew how to row. “I’d only seen rowing in the movies,” Jim remembers. “I knew how to row a dingy; I knew how to row a punt—I had no idea he was talking about something that was 63-feet long. But I fell in love with it right away.”

“I’d only seen rowing in the movies. I knew how to row a dingy; I knew how to row a punt—I had no idea he was talking about something that was 63-feet long. But I fell in love with it right away.”

Until Mark came to Ridley, rowing hadn’t been taken all that seriously. The Englishman had arrived just two years prior and had been busy overhauling the school’s rowing programme. Having rowed at both Hampton School and Cambridge University, Mark knew exactly what a competitive rowing programme entailed.

“The guys would get on a bus and go into Port Dalhousie. One group would go off and have some cigarettes and the others would row, and then they’d switch off,” Jim explains. “Then Mark came in and said, ‘The bus is being sold. If you want to row, you’ll need to buy a bicycle and you’ll need to ride down to the rowing shed and ride back. And don’t be late for dinner.’ Suddenly rowing was demanding.”

As part of his vision, Mark recruited local Olympic oarsman, Neil Campbell who, at the time, was living in nearby Vineland. “You’re a Ridley boy,” Mark entreated the athlete. “We’ve got rowing now. Would you come and coach us?” The rest, as they say, is history. Between Mark and Neil, what had once been a casual pastime soon became a big deal on campus, a challenging sport to which students aspired.

And, Jim quickly became one of them. He had come to Ridley in 1962 when he was just 12 years-old, fresh from Hamilton, Bermuda and following his older brother, George ’57. Jim’s brother, Tom, who was just slightly older than he, was sent to St. Andrew’s College—there was room for only one new Butterfield at Ridley that year, and their parents decided that Jim would benefit from having George nearby.

“I wrote six letters home that first week,” Jim laughs, looking back. “It was a bit shocking and I couldn’t just jump on a train and head back to Oakville or Toronto; I was homesick.”

But Jim soon settled into school, making friends and exploring the athletic opportunities he hadn’t had back home. And he was careful to heed George’s advice. “You’re from Bermuda—they’re going to want to put you in the pool,” he’d warned. “Don’t get in that pool! Take up ice hockey.”

So, Jim tried it all, from soccer to cross country to track and field—politely passing on cricket and football—and, as his brother had suggested, hitting the ice. “I loved ice hockey,” he smiles. “We used to break into the rink at two or three o’clock in the morning and skate until the night watchman kicked us out and sent us back to bed.”

Jim served on Ridley’s Board of Governors for 10 years and was active in the Bermuda community, fundraising, working to connect and rally Ridleians for the Old Boys meeting each year and organizing accommodations for the school’s visits to Bermuda.

But when he got to Upper School and started rowing, the sport took over. “We accomplished a lot, and would have died on our swords for Neil Campbell,” Jim remembers fondly, then the smallest of Ridley’s heavy eight at five-foot-ten. “He was an amazing coach and mentor, an idol for most of us. He would get out of the coach boat and into the heavy eight with us; he’d train with our crew after training with his own Olympic squad, then would show up perspiring in his track suit and say, ‘Ok, let’s get started.’”

Theirs was the first crew to go to Washington, D.C., the first to go to The Royal Henley. Each meet was a success—and their competitors were taking notice. Soon, Ridley became a powerful player in the high school rowing arena, their oarsmen the ones to look out for. Jim went on to win the Neil Campbell Oarsman of the Year.

“Our football coach, Reverend Hunt, used to say to us, ‘Keep your head up and keep your feet going. It was good advice.”

After Prize Day, Jim enrolled in Business Administration at Boston’s Northeastern University, a school known for its strong rowing programme. He ended up rowing in a single, due to his height, and became friends with classmate, Jim Dietz, who was the number one U.S. oarsman at the time. “He became a bit of a coach and mentor,” recounts Jim. “I would just do what he told me to do. We rowed together prior to Munich and he said, ‘Jim, I’m trying to get to the finals’—so I knew where I was going to end up.”

Jim represented Bermuda in the Men’s Single Sculls at the Munich Olympics in 1972—the only Bermudian ever to do so. That same season, he’d casually ‘popped in’ to run the Boston Marathon, showing up without any training or even a registration number. Because he was in such great shape, he ran the race in an impressive three hours, then spent the afternoon training and rowing.

“When I got back to my apartment that evening, I called Ed Pilgrim, Ridley’s headmaster,” Jim shares. “He’d once told us these stories from when he’d ran the Boston Marathon and it had struck me as something that would be cool to do one day. That always stayed with me.”

When Jim returned to Bermuda, its windy weather and big tides soon made it clear that it wasn’t a place to row. Recognizing he’d need to pivot, Jim sent his rowing shell back to Boston and took up cycling, hoping to qualify for the Olympics in Montreal. However, during a rather disappointing trial in North Carolina, he realized that, without a team, he didn’t have a prayer. “I was an individual in a team sport,” he shrugs. “It wasn’t going to happen.”

Debbie would go on to place fourth in the 1985 Boston Marathon and participated in the U.S. Olympic trials. She’s run many impressive races and has become an inspirational figure in distance running, helping to bring women into the sport.

It was then that Jim took up running seriously, training for marathons with his wife, Debbie—who’s an athletic powerhouse in her own right. Back when Debbie had first announced she was going to take up marathon running, they’d laughed. But, inspired by the runners she’d seen in Boston, she soon proved her doubters wrong, training every morning before work. She would go on to place fourth in the 1985 Boston Marathon and participated in the U.S. Olympic trials. Debbie has since run many impressive races and has become an inspirational figure in distance running, helping to bring women into the sport.

It was 1976 when the pair moved back to Bermuda; they enjoyed road running as a couple and understood the sacrifices required to excel. An early morning or late for dinner was easily forgiven, as each pushed themselves to get their miles in for the day.

“Debbie and I were among the first white people doing any sort of road running. It just wasn’t done. People would see us running down the road and yell, ‘Hey! Are you late? Do you need a lift?”

However, their training was proving to push cultural boundaries as well. Bermuda is a friendly, yet conservative place, with a history of slavery and segregation of which its citizens are mindful. In the late seventies, sport was still quite segregated—soccer and cricket were for black athletes and fans, while sailing was for the white population. Road running was one of the ways this divide was bridged, and today sports in Bermuda is very much integrated.

Jim and Debbie earned spots on the board of the Bermuda Track & Field Association and the Butterfields soon became synonymous with running; they were among a group that started the Mid-Atlantic Athletic Club. In the years that followed, Jim ran the Boston, Deluth, New York and London marathons, and competed at the Commonwealth Games.

“[The Hawaiian Ironman] was the result of a guy I knew giving me a magazine. He said, ‘Jim, you’ve gotta read this; these guys are sick. But I didn’t think they were sick—I thought, this sounds so cool, and I started training in earnest.”

As back trouble forced him to incorporate more swimming and cycling into his routine, Jim brought triathlon to Bermuda; he was organizing races as far back as 1979. In 1981, Jim finished the Hawaiian Ironman Triathlon in seventh place.

In 1999, when Jim turned 50, he cycled 100 miles a day from Irvine, California to Boston, Massachusetts to raise money for P.A.L.S., a cancer care centre in Bermuda. It took him 30 days. Seven years later, he was inducted into the Bermuda Sports Hall of Fame.

Since Jim’s semi-retirement in 2018, Spencer runs Butterfield & Vallis, the family’s fourth-generation food import business. The company was founded in 1918 by Jim’s grandfather, H. St. George Butterfield.

That passion for sports runs in the family: his wife, daughter-in-law, and niece have all competed on the international sports stage, and Jim’s sons are both highly athletic. 38-year-old Tyler is based in Colorado and is a professional triathlete, finishing seventh and then fifth in Hawaii. Spencer, now 40, competes in triathlons in his downtime, and heliskis, wakeboards, and surfs. Since Jim’s semi-retirement in 2018, Spencer runs Butterfield & Vallis, the family’s fourth-generation food import business. The company was founded in 1918 by Jim’s grandfather, H. St. George Butterfield.

That passion for sports runs in the family: his wife, daughter-in-law, and niece have all competed on the international sports stage, and Jim’s sons are both highly athletic.

For Jim, who has worked there for more than forty years, stepping back has offered him the perfect opportunity to focus on philanthropic endeavours. It seems that generosity also runs in the family—and Jim comes by it honestly. His grandfather awarded scholarships to four different schools in Bermuda as early as the 1930s.

It’s clear Jim’s service and contributions mean a lot to those around him. He’s widely recognized as a generous leader in the community, who works to improve the social, economic and environmental conditions of his country. He was honoured by the Association of Fundraising Professionals in 2015.

Photo published November 15, 2015 on Bernews.com.

Jim is modest when speaking about it, however. In a small place like Bermuda, he reasons, it’s easy to see where the need is, and it’s often simple to resolve—whether that means replacing the church’s appliances so they can feed those who need a little help, or rebuilding the living conditions at the Salvation Army—A project Jim completed with fellow Ridleian, Kirk Kitson ’58). Jim is also on the board of the Sloop Foundation—a cause close to his heart that sends at-risk youth out to sea for a week on board a hundred-foot ‘floating classroom.’ 

“As I’ve gotten older, it feels good to be able to give back, to participate. I look at those Houses—Merritt House and Gooderham House—and I think about those Old Ridleians who gave to the bricks and mortar so that people like us could attend Ridley, could create those great memories and friendships.”

Speaking with this Old Ridleian, it’s clear how sport can serve one’s life in so many positive ways: breaking down barriers, bridging communities and bringing a family closer together. And, as time goes on and goals change, the athlete’s journey might shift, might even go from land to sea and back again—but that demand for excellence, that drive to meet a challenge, never does quite fade.

“Our football coach, Reverend Hunt, used to say to us, ‘Keep your head up and keep your feet going,’” Jim says good-naturedly, as we finish our conversation. It’s a beautiful sunny day in Bermuda, and he’s heading out for a bike ride around the island. “It was good advice.”

This article was printed in the latest issue of Tiger magazine. Learn about our alumni, get community updates and find out where Ridley is heading next! Read more from the Spring 2021 issue.

TransfORming Our Globe – Luc Brodeur ’14 & Laura Court ’14

For this month’s installment of the TransfORming Our Globe series, we’re sharing the story of alumni, Luc Brodeur ’14 and Laura Court ’14, who both recently competed for Canada at the U23 World Rowing Championships in Bulgaria.

Luc’s Journey
Luc Brodeur ’14 became a Ridleian in 2010. A natural-born athlete, he jumped at the chance to row when he began at Ridley. When Luc wasn’t out on the water, he was developing a passion for biology and acquiring leadership skills through the Cadet Programme. It wasn’t until his Grade 11 year that his rowing talents began to soar. Under the guidance of Olympian and Coach, Jason Dorland ’83, Luc quickly excelled in the sport.

“[Coach Dorland’s] philosophy and training program allowed me to push my limits every day and to become a humble, mature, and disciplined oarsman. Improvements in terms of my fitness, technique and mentality were made in very large amounts over the two years spent with him. This was when university coaches began to pay attention to how I was doing and when they became interested in me. I owe a lot to Jason.”
– Luc Brodeur ’14

When Luc graduated – alongside his fellow U23 National teammate, Laura Court ’14 – he took the skills he learned on the water and in the classroom with him, beginning his post-graduate studies at Brock University before heading to the University of Victoria to study Biology and row with its varsity team.

This summer, Luc was named to the U23 National Team, competing for Canada in the Men’s quadruple sculls race. This was Luc’s third time competing at the World Championships – once at the Junior level and twice at the U23 level. Team Canada performed well this year in Bulgaria, with Luc’s quad placing 7th in the finals.

While Luc is making headlines in the world of rowing, he doesn’t plan to stop there. He’s striving towards goals in both rowing and science, with hopes of making it to the Olympics and becoming a researcher in the field of human genetics.

Laura’s Journey
Laura Court ’14 began Ridley in Grade 5, making her a “Lifer” by the time she graduated high school in 2014. She started her rowing career as a coxswain in Grade 9, where she was tasked with the responsibility of both steering the shell during a race and coaching her crew to the finish line. She spent all four years with the Ridley College Rowing Club, was involved in the arts on campus and was a House Captain during her final year.

Upon graduation, Laura began her studies at Brock University. She is currently in her fourth year of Psychology and has been an important member of Brock Rowing. “Ridley helped me understand what it was like to work hard and persevere and taught me time management skills, which help me juggle my studies and a hectic rowing schedule,” says Laura.

While rowing as a Brock Badger, Laura was given the opportunity to represent her school at the Canadian University Rowing Championships and has done so for the past three years. Laura’s coach recognized her drive and introduced her to the Rowing Canada coach in the Spring of 2016. In May 2017, Laura was invited to the Rowing Canada selection camp – alongside several Old Ridleians – and was named to the U23 National Team.

During the U23 World Championships in August 2017, Team Canada’s women’s eight crew captured gold during the finals. Laura’s big win has motivated her to take her talents even further, with hopes of making the U23 team again next year, followed by the Senior National team when she graduates university.

“Knowing that I still have a lot to learn and that I know I’m willing to put in the work to continue to progress is a big motivator. But another is the women I train with. They are a big reason I still enjoy waking up early. Having a taste of international competition at the U23 World Championships has made me that much more motivated. ”
– Laura Court ’14

Both Luc and Laura have worked tirelessly to pursue their goals, both in the classroom and on the water. To Ridleians who are unlocking their own potential and discovering their passions, they say this:

“One of the biggest things that current and future Ridleians should remember is to never stop believing that they can do great things. Anybody can do anything that they set their minds to. No matter how much adversity one must face to achieve greatness, it is important to never lose sight of what you want and to never give up. If there is something you want, go for it and don’t hold back.”
– Luc Brodeur ’14

“Don’t be afraid to ask for help and be patient. If I had never asked my coach what my next steps were, I wouldn’t have been able to take them. Then I had to be patient and wait for the right time. It’s all about the process, enjoy it. If you have a passion for something, don’t be afraid to pursue it.”                        – Laura Court ’14


TransfORming Our Globe is a blog series where we share the exciting stories of alumni who are leading flourishing lives and changing the world. It is important to Ridley College to support our alumni and share the stories of Old Ridleians, who discovered their passion and found success and happiness down the path of their choosing. 

Do you know of any classmates that are living flourishing lives or transforming our globe? Email any suggestions for the TransfORming Our Globe blog series to development@ridleycollege.com.

 

 

 

Experiential Learning Away from Home

Ridley students participated in three experiential learning trips over the March Break: a South African science adventure, Vimy 100, a history trip commemorating the 100th anniversary of the Battle of Vimy Ridge and our Ridley rowing crews hit the shores of Vancouver Island for pre-season training.

In South Africa, students had the opportunity to learn about and contribute to ongoing field research. They visited the Balule Game Reserve, where our young scientists participated in lectures and collected data on insects, herbivores, and birds—they even experienced a mock-charge by an elephant. The second week was spent at Sodwana Bay, a UNESCO World Heritage Site, with scuba diving—five students earned their PADI open water certification—reef ecology lectures, snorkeling, rock pool tours, dune walks, and a surprise visit from some local Zulu dancers. View photos.

North of the equator, Ridley students had a chance to relive history as they toured the many historic sites from both World Wars in France and Belgium. They visited the Vimy Memorial—which is commemorating the 100th anniversary of the WWI battle, Passchendaele—where they experienced a recreation of a WWI battlefield, and Juno Beach—the site of Canada’s D-Day Landing in WWII. Other stops included Ypres, the Menin Gate, Dieppe, the Eiffel Tower, the Louvre, and Napoleon’s Tomb. The group visited the graves or memorials for nine Old Ridleians, who died fighting in the two World Wars.

“It was a moving, rewarding, and emotional trip” – Mrs. Linda Chang, Ridley Parent

Leaving behind the thawing Royal Henley course in Port Dalhousie, our competitive rowing crews spent part of their March  break practicing on Canada’s West Coast, at Shawnigan Lake School. The trip focused on team-building and technical development. Ridley crews rowed through snow during one training session, while (before another in Victoria) they enjoyed a visit from a group of seals. Ample time on the water and competition with rowers from the University of Victoria, Victoria City Rowing Club, and the Canadian National Team, have our crews ready for upcoming spring regattas.

Our Ridleians showed how dedicated they are, using their March break–a time for rest and relaxation–to better themselves, better their team and better the environment. There is no doubt that these students returned home with stories to tell and memories that they will carry with them.

 

Get to Know Your Prefects: Shaun D. ’17

Introducing Shaun Donnelly ’17 – a Prefect who learned the value of Screen Shot 2016-09-28 at 10.19.48 AMspontaneity and risk-taking during her time at Ridley. Read how she grew and discovered who she is by stepping out of her comfort zone.

Why did you choose Ridley?

Three of my older siblings attended Ridley before me, which made me very aware of the incredible range of opportunities, programmes, and facilities that would be available to me. This is the main reason why I chose to enroll; though the sunny and college-like atmosphere of the campus was also very appealing.

Did you feel prepared coming to Ridley?

I did have some sense going into Grade 9 (my first year at Ridley) that it would be quite the challenge and a significant step-up from elementary school, but I figured I would eventually adapt to the extra demands. I didn’t feel prepared, but I felt prepared to be unprepared. 

Who is your favourite faculty member and why?

My favourite teacher is passionate, committed, patient, enthusiastic, wise, entertaining, and treats teaching as a vocation. To be completely honest, I really can’t pick one because they’re all like that.

What has been your greatest challenge thus far at Ridley?

The greatest challenge I have faced thus far at Ridley was the transition from Grade 10 to full International Baccalaureate (IB). Going into Grade 11 (year one of IB) I knew that balancing the added demands of IB, such as an even more rigorous curriculum, night classes, and the extended essay – along with being a member of the rowing team – would be a lot to manage. This schedule was indeed very overwhelming at the start, but the skills and knowledge that I acquired by working through this challenge made it more than worth it.

What has been your greatest accomplishment thus far at Ridley? 

My greatest accomplishment thus far at Ridley has been my development into the person I am today. My personality going into Grade 9 was very simple; I was very shy and obsessed with perfection… The prospect of me ever even applying for prefectship seemed absolutely absurd in my mind at the time. Throughout the past three years, I have been forced outside of my comfort zone and humbled by the increased difficulty of my classes and athletic pursuits. I tried a number of new things, such as debate team, Mandarin class, and meditation, and discovered new passions (computer programming and rowing). These experiences taught me the value of spontaneity and risk-taking. Even if your leap of faith turns out to be a total failure, you’ll certainly learn something or at least have some fun trying.

What has been your favorite Ridley experience?

My absolute favourite Ridley experience has been rowing. I joined the rowing team in Grade 10, and despite all of the sore muscles and blisters, it has been incredibly fun. The rowing team is like one big, crazy family; through training together, sometimes between three and four hours a day, we have become so close. Highlights of my Ridley rowing experience have been travelling to Miami for our annual March break training camp and to Philadelphia to race in the Stotesbury Cup Regatta – the world’s largest high school regatta.

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What is your favourite part of Ridley life? 

My favourite part of Ridley life is the diversity. Having friends from all over the world is truly fascinating and enlightening. In a world riddled with conflicts and prejudice surrounding cultural and racial differences, it’s refreshing to see such a diverse population living together in this little community, becoming as close as family.

What part of being a Prefect are you most excited for?

I am most excited to use this position of influence to serve as a role model for younger students and show them the value of taking advantage of all that Ridley has to offer. Of course, Prefects do get to do a few especially fun things. Of these, I was most excited to light the fire and lead the cheering at Snake Dance. 

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How has Ridley prepared you for the future?

Ridley has molded me into a person who I hope could survive quite well under the wrath of the “real world”, and I attribute this development to the ongoing challenge that is the rigorous Ridley schedule and its high-functioning environment. I was forced to break out of my shyness, taught the value of professionalism, and encouraged to develop a certain boldness, that I see serving me well in all kinds of situations. I learned the importance of preparedness, but also came to understand the role that feeling and seeming confident plays in success, even in times when one does not feel completely prepared.

What are your plans after graduation?

Following graduation next year, I want to study computer science and economics. I hope to then go on to work at and eventually manage a computer software company. In terms of extracurricular activities, I hope to be a member of my new university’s lightweight women’s rowing team and continue to pursue my passion for improving the well-being of Canada’s Indigenous peoples.

What advice would you give prospective students about Ridley?

The simple advice that I would give to anybody thinking of coming to Ridley is to go for it; and once you’re here, you have to maintain that “go for it” attitude. Ridley has so much to offer, but you will only get out of it what you put into it. This being said, be sure not to spread yourself too thin by committing to too many different things, which can be very tempting in such a busy place.

Get to Know Your Prefects – Kai S. ‘17

Screen Shot 2016-08-31 at 9.02.01 AMIntroducing Kai Scott ’17 – a Prefect who has an appreciation for hard work and perseverance. Read how he has found success during his time at Ridley.

Why did you choose Ridley?

As a local student, I felt like Ridley provided a unique learning experience, that made it stand out from other high schools in the area at the time. My family and I also felt that Ridley provided a much more well-rounded and multi-faceted schooling than I could have gotten at another place. I think this level of involvement really drew us in to the school.

Did you feel prepared coming to Ridley?

Definitely not! As somebody who had changed schools only once before and had never really been in such a diverse community like Ridley’s, I certainly felt a bit overwhelmed with the whole experience right at the beginning. As soon as I realized how understanding and ready to help the students and teachers around me were, I settled in pretty quickly. I think it was also important for me to realize that I was far from the only kid going through this process!

Who is your favourite faculty member and why?

My favourite teacher would have to be Dr. Foster. She’s always ready to laugh and she definitely keeps TOK [Theory of Knowledge] and French classes entertaining and engaging. There’s never a dull class with Dr. Foster!

What has been your greatest challenge thus far at Ridley?

I’d have to say that my toughest challenge throughout my time at Ridley has been balancing my sports and school schedules. A major part of the Ridley experience is just how busy you are kept from eight in the morning, through to the time your head hits the pillow each night…Despite this, I persevered and worked through the difficulties.

What has been your greatest accomplishment thus far at Ridley?

The greatest accomplishment I’ve had with Ridley was winning the bronze medal this year at the CSSRA championships in the Junior 72kg Coxed Four category. While I rowed in a faster boat the year before, I felt as though the bronze medal that I won this past year came from a group that, throughout the year, had struggled and persevered through some trying experiences. The amount of grit and will that went into that boat made our medals carry a sense of accomplishment and pride that only comes from success following hard work.

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What has been your favourite Ridley experience?

I’d have to say being involved in Snake Dance was one of my Ridley experiences that stands out. There is a sense of togetherness and excitement that is hard to replicate with any other activity during the year. The raw energy that Snake Dance brings out of people is powerful. It is one of my favourite Ridley traditions to take part in.

What is your favourite part of Ridley life?

Even though I’m a day boy, house life is part of the Ridley life that I like to be a part of. Houses become like big families, and this makes it really fun to spend time in the evenings talking and hanging out with your housemates. The comfortability that the house setting gives students makes it easy for us to relax and be a bit more open and I think that this makes it a really important part of Ridley existence.

What part of being a Prefect are you most excited for?

I’m super excited for the chance be a part of this year’s Prefect team. I think that I’m most excited to, as a Prefect, be able to help out the students around me and be able to hopefully have a positive impact on my peers. As a Prefect I want to be as approachable as possible and give other students an outlet to talk to.

How has Ridley prepared you for the future?

Ridley has put me in a position to be able to deal with the stresses of the real world. Ridley has given us, as students, the ability to balance and manage our lives in a way that would have taken years of painful university cram sessions and all-nighters otherwise. Life is busy and Ridley has given us an opportunity to learn how to deal with it properly. On top of this, Ridley has given us a view into the increasingly globalized world of today. I’ve been able to meet people from places throughout the world, and through this, I’ve learned to widen my horizons and gain a new understanding of the world.

What are your plans after graduation?

After graduation, I plan on taking a gap year to travel and get involved in volunteer projects abroad. I think that there is a lot that can be learned about the world around us and to truly understand it I believe that we need to get outside of the classroom and into the multitude of cultures around the world.

What advice would you give prospective students about Ridley?

Ridley, at first, can seem a bit daunting and scary, but try to move past that initial fear and you’ll see Ridley for the welcoming, diverse and open community that it is!

Ridley Rowers Cap 50th Successful Season

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As two Ridley rowers prepare to take on competitors from across North America at an elite international regatta in July, Ridley is celebrating the 50th anniversary of our school’s highly successful rowing programme.

The latest rowing milestone for Ridley came with the recent announcement by Rowing Canada Aviron that student athletes Clark Schultz ’17, of Grimsby, Ontario, and Seth Moyer ’18, of Beamsville, Ontario, have been selected among 48 athletes from across Canada to compete for the Junior National Team, which includes teams for both the CanAmMex Regatta and Junior World Rowing Championships.

Clark and Seth will join the CanAmMex team at a training camp in Sarasota, Florida beginning July 11, 2016 before competition on July 16 and 17.

Having the two student athletes named to the CanAmMex team helps cap what has been a great 50th anniversary season of rowing for Ridley, where the program is led by our head coaches Siobhan McLaughlin and Dereck Schwandt.

“We’re extremely proud of Clark and Seth,” said Coach Schwandt. “Both of them worked extremely hard and earned great results throughout the season. It’s a remarkable achievement for them to be selected to this team and face the best young rowers across North America.”

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Earlier this month Ridley crews qualified in eight final events at the Canadian Secondary Schools Rowing Association Regatta, winning a total of four medals — gold, silver and two bronze. In May, Ridley’s rowers and dedicated coaches hit the road to compete in the Stotesbury Cup in Philadelphia and the Welland SNRC Invitational, performing well at both regattas. Ridley captured first place in the Junior Men’s 4x in Philadelphia. The following day in Welland, Ridley crews captured first place in the Senior Men’s 4x, Senior Girls’ Lightweight 1x and Senior Girls’ 4x (mixed 4x event) races. Seth Moyer also achieved two third place finishes in the Men’s 1x and Men’s 72kg 1x at the SNRC Invitational.

After launching the rowing programme with a single racing shell in the spring of 1966, Ridley quickly established itself as a contender. Just two years after the program hit the water, Ridley claimed its first Calder Cleland trophy as Canadian Schoolboy Champion (Canadian Secondary Schools Rowing Association Champion) and placed second in standing for overall points.

Over the past five decades Ridley has continued this tradition of excellence and established itself as one of Canada’s most successful secondary school rowing programs.

Highlights over the past 50 years include:

  • 14 Ridley alumni have rowed at Olympic Games.
  • Since entering the CSSRA Championships in 1968, Ridley College is third among all secondary schools in gold medals between 1941 and 2015.
  • 82 gold medals won at CSSRA Championships.
  • 25 victories at Stotesbury Cup Regatta (American Secondary School Championships).
  • Five Princess Elizabeth Challenge Cup victories at the Henley Royal Regatta in England — arguably the most prestigious rowing regatta in the world. This is tied for second most among all schools and leads all overseas schools.
  • Two Thames Challenge Cup victories at the Henley Royal Regatta.
  • Ridley hosts the Ontario Ergometer Championships annually, attracting the best rowers from across the province.

 “Over the past 50 years, we’ve established an incredible standard in this sport and we look forward to building on our reputation in the years ahead,” said Jay Tredway, Director of Athletics. “Our student athletes represent the school extremely well, both on and off the water. We are not only developing excellent athletes, but also leaders and global ambassadors.”

Read the Niagara this Week article.

Listen to CKTB’s interview with Ridley’s Director of Athletics.

HomeComing 2015

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This past weekend, Ridley graduates from far and wide returned to campus for HomeComing; where they had the chance to see friends, reminisce about old times, and make new memories. 

FRIDAY

This year in particular, we celebrated classes whose years ended in 0’s and 5’s, and honoured the class of 1965 as 2015’s Golden Tigers.

Friday’s events began with the Golden Tigers luncheon with Headmaster, Ed Kidd and his wife, Hanna, followed by a tour of the new buildings on campus. Later in the evening, OR’s, Governor’s, faculty and friends gathered in school house to watch the unveiling of the 125 Donor Wall, which proudly displays the names of those who made major donations to the school during the 125th year. The Governors’ Dinner rounded out the day’s events with OR’s from 1945 all the way up to 2010 dined in the Great Hall.

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SATURDAY

Saturday began with Alumni Rowing, where twelve OR’s took to Royal Canadian Henley Regatta to row with the current Ridley Crew. The rain did make a brief appearance, but the rowers had smiles on their faces nonetheless.

Back on campus, OR’s began to fill up the tent, tour their old houses, visit with their old teachers and enjoy their time back on the Ridley grounds. The bleachers in the Griffith Gym were filled to capacity, as the inaugural “Athletes of Distinction” presentation began. This was an opportunity for us to celebrate some of Ridley’s greatest athletes, such as Fiona Milne ‘90 (Canadian, Olympic rower) and Alexander Hayes 30’(Grey Cup Champion). Luckily, the sun came out just in time for the OR’s to enjoy some afternoon sports. 

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SUNDAY

On the final day of HomeComing, OR’s sat down in the Memorial Chapel for the “Founder’s Day” service, followed by Prayers of Remembrance and a dedication in the memory of John Stevens, ’42. Our last item of the Weekend was an alumni soccer game.

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Thank you to all who attended and participated in another successful HomeComing weekend.

For all the photos from HomeComing weekend, check out Ridley’s official Flickr page!

“There’s nothing half so pleasant as coming home again” ­– Margaret Elizabeth Sangster

 

 

Ridley College Athletes Find Balance

When you think about yoga, you might not picture basketball players, hockey players or rowers doing a downward dog, but this isn’t the case at Ridley College.  On Thursdays during activity time these Ridley athletes are doing yoga in the exercise room below the Griffith Gym.

Warm-up Pose - lengthens the spine and increases flexibility in hips

It is a regenerative component to their athletic program.  Besides, who wouldn’t enjoy an hour of stretching and relaxing breathing exercises after a grueling week of sports, and school stress? Yoga is a great way to clear your head and find inner balance. But this is not the only benefit these athletes may gain; range of motion can increase, which can help in competition.  Mr. DeVellis initiated the idea of yoga for athletes and he says one of the most important things the athletes can get out of yoga is the ability to listen to their body, it is an important life lesson, and one that these athletes will hopefully take with them throughout life.

Ridley College students stretch in child's pose

Today, I observed the yoga class and as the minutes went on, more and more exhausting faces could be seen, trying to stretch the hamstrings just a bit more doing the downward facing dog pose.

Our athletes facing the challenge of the downward dog pose

Not many of our athletes had tried yoga before, and initially they were curious and insecure, but they have embraced it over time and many have indicated how great they feel afterwards.  They are more resilient, have better control of their body and mind- and who knows? Maybe, by the end of the season they might be able to turn their body into a human pretzel.

Ridley athletes trying to find their balance in yoga class

Content contributed by Anna B. ’12

Ridley Rowers Show Well at Henley Regatta

Madison Leitch and Alison Whitty pulled off a late race charge to capture the Under 19 Womens Doubles Championship Friday evening at the Canadian Henley Regatta. The girls were comfortably in third place as they approached the Island, moved quickly through the Vancouver crew for 2nd as they passed the 1500 m pylon and finally chased down, then passed Victoria City from B.C. with about 200 metres to go. A few rough strokes as they neared the finish line added to the drama but the girls from Ridley would not be denied. 76 Crews from across North America started in this category and 1 was left standing to hoist the Thorne Family Trophy!

Connar Boyd ’12 and Austin Bald ’12 finished third in the Under 19 Men’s Pair final on Saturday.  Colin MacKay ’11 and Austin Bald ’12 placed third with their crew in the Under 19 Men’s Eight race on Sunday.

 

Ridley Rowers Advance to Finals At Henley

Connar Boyd ’12 and Austin Bald ’12 came first in the semi-final Men’s Under 19 Pair at the Henley this afternoon.  Jordan Meyers ’12 and Grav Gravson placed second in the same race.  Both crews will be in the finals tomorrow at 12:30! Alison Whitty ’12 and Madison Leitch ’12 race in the final Under 19 Women’s Double tonight at 6:15 pm.  Good luck Ridleians!! To watch online or to view results visit: www.henleyregatta.ca

Watch the boys in action: